Stella Adler Studio

INTERVIEWS with ARTISTS

BEN VEREEN

JEANINE TESORI

PSALMAYENE 24

SYLVIA MCNAIR

MICHAEL McELROY

DEIDRE KINAHAN

BOB ARI

PAUL TAZEWELL

PATRICIA ROZARIO

NANCY RHODES

MAIA DANZIGER

EARL “PEANUTT” MONTGOMERY

WILLIE RUFF

DENNIS D’AMICO

GRACE CACHOCHA

KAREN SAILLANT

JENNIFER HORNE

JEANIE THOMPSON

ROBERT PERRY

WAYNE SIDES

JAMIE LEE McMAHAN

“You are led through your lifetime by the inner learning creature, the playful spiritual being that is your real self.”
– Richard Bach

“Never underestimate the power of dreams and the influence of the human spirit. We are all the same in this notion: The potential for greatness lives within each of us.”
– Wilma Rudolph

“Always dream and shoot higher than you know you can do. Don’t bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.”
– William Faulkner

“Every day is a new day. It is better to be lucky. But I would rather be exact. Then when luck comes you are ready.”
– Ernest Hemingway

“My favorite piece of music is the one we hear all the time if we are quiet.”
– John Cage

 


Articles

Kenny Leon’s True Colors Theatre Company

Black Theatre United

Mabou Mines

Theater J

Pangea World Theater

Round House Theatre

Bucks County Playhouse

Charleston Stage

Maryland Ensemble Theatre

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

PURE Theatre Company

Ronald Rand’s “CREATE! How Extraordinary People Live to Create and Create to Live”

Virginia Stage Company

Constellation Theatre Company

League of Professional Theatre Women

Maryland Hall

BlackRock Center for the Arts

Great American Songbook Foundation & Academy

Kennedy Center REACH

Inter Act Art Theatre

“Grand Ball in the Belle Epoch” – Edwardian Period Style Salon

“There is a vitality, a life force, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique, and if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium, and be lost. The world will not have it. It is not your business to determine how good it is, not how it compares with other expression. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open.”
– Martha Graham

 

 

 

“The poem, the song, the picture, is only water drawn from the well of the people, and it should be given back to them in a cup of beauty so that they may drink - and in drinking understand themselves.”
– Federico Garcia Lorca

“Living consciously involves being genuine; it involves listening and responding to others honestly and openly; it involves being in the moment.”
– Sidney Poitier

“The artist must be a leader. He must be true to what is most eager, vital and boldest within himself. Only in this way can the audience gain something from him. By being awake himself, the artist must awaken the audience. This ultimately is what the audience also desires – to be awakened.”
– Harold Clurman

 

“Life is short, Break the Rules. Forgive quickly, Kiss SLOWLY. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably And never regret ANYTHING That makes you smile.”
– Mark Twain

“One must surrender entirely to the power of one’s artistic nature. It will do all the necessary things. Do not impose any solution upon yourself in advance.”
– Yevgeny Vakhtangov

 

“As an artist, I feel that we must try many things—but above all, we must dare to fail. You must have the courage to be willing to risk everything to really express it all.”
– John Cassavetes

 

 

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company

The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is now celebrating its 18th season as a Maryland theatre company, its sixth season in Baltimore, becoming a leader in the Maryland cultural community. 

Founded in 2002, Chesapeake Shakespeare Company’s new indoor cultural center, located near the Inner Harbor in downtown Baltimore, opened in September 2014. The theatre transformed a 19th Century landmark bank building into a modern 260-seat theater inspired by Shakespeare’s Globe. The inaugural Season for Celebration opened with a week of festivities, including a ribbon-cutting on September 15, 2014.

The cultural center includes The Studio and home of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company’s acting courses and workshops for adults and youth, with courses for personal growth, community engagement, acting, theatre craft and design disciplines, critical analysis of plays, and day camp programs.

The 2019-2020 season included: “Dracula,” “Measure for Measure,” “The Complete Works of Shakespeare Abridged,” “Hamlet,” “A Christmas Carol” and “Much Ado About Nothing.” Founder and Artistic Director Ian Gallanar, Managing Director Lesley Malin, a Board of Trustees, plus more than fifty artists, are the major forces behind Chesapeake Shakespeare Company’s success.

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company School Matinees

Recently, Ian Gallanar, Artistic Director & Lesley Malin, Managing Director notified their subscribers and audiences expressing their gratefulness for their continued kindness and patience as they navigate the rapid changes owing the crisis. They wrote: “Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is, and always will be, committed to exploring alongside you, with vibrant, innovative, fun productions, what makes Shakespeare so great. We look forward to bringing you a lineup brimming with stories that have long weathered tempests and continue to act as beacons of hope and humanity.”

“Romeo and Juliet”

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company believes in instilling the love of Shakespeare and live theatre early in life and two children’s tickets are free to every production when accompanied by one paying adult.

When we sat down with to interview Artistic Director Ian Gallanar, he told us: “I attended Indiana University in Indiana, Pennsylvania as a theater major. I had to have had thirty-three mailing addresses in my career, which has culminated with the founding of the Baltimore theater.”

“The creation of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company really began back in Minneapolis, Minnesota when I was leading the National Theatre for Children, a national touring company there. The staff was laid-off in the summer and I wanted my actors to work full-time. Minnesota Shakespeare in the Park had just closed down and I decided to pick up that acting company as a summer project for the Twin Cities. As soon as I directed “Much Ado About Nothing,” it created such a challenge for me that I found my love of Shakespeare and it changed my life.”

“From Minnesota, I led the Repertory Theater of America, another touring company that did lighter fare such as Neil Simon and was located in Texas. It had been doing productions for dinner theaters and that format of theater was losing its popularity. So, I decided that my love of Shakespeare was so great that I reviewed all the cities and found out that Baltimore didn’t have a Shakespeare company and so I moved the company to Maryland in 1999.”

“Chesapeake Shakespeare Company was founded in 2002. Its first production was a showcase of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, which I directed, and it was performed for about a hundred patrons. Soon afterwards, the theater company made its home in historic Ellicott City, Maryland, where we built a stage each summer in the stabilized ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute, a 19th century school for girls. Audiences followed Chesapeake Shakespeare Company to winter shows in a variety of rented performance spaces in Howard County.”

“Henry IV”

“I didn’t connect to Shakespeare for many years and thought it was for “fancy” people. However, that idea changed once I realized that there are all kinds of ways for people to connect to Shakespeare. I’m on a mission that Shakespeare is for everyone. Shakespeare shows what is means to be ‘uniquely human.’ It’s so important that we have a ‘shared humanity,’ and my mission is to bridge gaps and find out what we have in common and bring people from all walks of life together in the theater.”

“Some members in the company have been with us for fifteen years! Every spring Chesapeake Shakespeare Company performs nine to ten weeks of “Romeo and Juliet,” so that all Baltimore schools can bring their classes to see Shakespeare for free.”

“Romeo and Juliet”

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company’s new theater, located near the Inner Harbor in downtown Baltimore, opened in September 2014. Six years after establishing a theater for the classics in a once-decaying corner of downtown Baltimore, Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is fulfilling its promise to be a dynamic performing arts resource for Maryland and a catalyst and leader in Calvert Street’s renaissance.

Valerie Fenton, Kevin Brown, Ron Heneghan, and Steven J. Hoochuk in ”The Taming of the Shrew.’ (Photo: Teresa Castracane)

Since arriving in Baltimore in 2014, the theater company has doubled the number of performances it stages each year and produced the top-selling shows in its history, employing professional artists and technicians based in the Baltimore-D.C. region.  As the classical theater of Maryland, Chesapeake Shakespeare Company annually presents eight professional productions of Shakespeare’s works and other plays of classic stature.

“Measure for Measure”

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company also continues to perform outdoors every summer at its longtime home in the picturesque PFI Historic Park in Ellicott City, Maryland. Each summer, thousands join CSC under the stars for festival-style productions of Shakespeare’s works in an enchanting, family-friendly setting. The staff and artists at Chesapeake Shakespeare Company are attempting to create a new model for what a “theater company” is – one that connects to its community and its neighbors in an open way, and one that serves all members of the community including those who don’t have easy access to the arts.

Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is a Folger Shakespeare Library affiliate theatre and a member of the Shakespeare Theatre Association (STA), the international organization for professional Shakespeare theatres. Mr. Gallanar is president of the Shakespeare Theatre Association. For info: Chesapeake Shakespeare Company 7 South Calvert Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202, (404) 244-8571, www.chesapeakeshakespeare.com

 


"It is a law of life that man cannot live for himself alone. Extreme individualism is insanity. The world's problems are also our personal problems. Health is achieved through maintaining our personal truth in a balanced relation of love to the rest of the world. No expression is more emblematic of this relation than the creative act which we call art. No art by its very constitution typifies the social nature of that creative act more than the theatre. The theatre, to be fully understood and appreciated, must be seen as a manifestation of this process of interchange between society and the individual. It must be judged as a continuous development of groups of individuals within society, a development which becomes richer, acquires greater force and value as it grows with the society in which it originates. Only in this way can the theatre nourish us.  - Harold Clurman

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